Why 'YOU' Should Play Fighting Games - lightslingergame.com

Why ‘YOU’ Should Play Fighting Games

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Disclaimer: I am not a fighting game pro 🙂

Fighting games are known to be a ‘niche’ genre in the gaming industry. This video will explain a little a bit about fighting games and show you some of the lucrative things it brings to the table. Hopefully, by the end video you might wanna pick your controller/stick and give it a try.

Hope you enjoyed my first video!

Please do all the fancy things by subscribing, liking and commenting.
I intend to make more videos about different games that I have played and share my thoughts on them with the world.

Add me on steam if you would like to play some fighting games against me 🙂

30 Comments

  1. Hmm… Hate to be that guy but I think your reasoning as to why people should play fighting games is a bit… off?

    I get that the reason you picked up fg's again is because you has a friend to compete with, but in that case, why should people without fg-playing friends pick them up? What about people that aren't that competitive? Or in that case, people who don't have too much faith in their abilities?

    Next thing of note is that you mention points such as "you can choose your own progression" in saying why fg's are worth playing. Then again, though, don't you choose your progression in most games anyway? It also seems that fg's, out of EVERY game type, seems to be the most demanding due to it being pvp oriented as well as very technical in the first place, so what do you have to say about that, too?

    I do like the editing though; for a first video, this is pretty good. Keep it up, and I hope these concerns can be addressed

  2. I like fighting games because its like learning a skill. You improve as a player as you continue to play as opposed to your character leveling up via arbitrary stats boosts like in rpgs. They're also great to play if you have a busy schedule too since I could play a few rounds of Tekken or Smash just to scratch that itch in between other stuff.

  3. Me, who lacks both knowledge and fucks up probably half of the imputs: I press buttons hoping something works.

  4. Me learning fighting games years ago: mindless mashing
    Me playing fighting games now: mashing with intent

  5. New subscriber, these are some good ass videos bro. I'd love to see more in future!

  6. I was thinking “this guys pretty cool” and then I looked at the subs and said “150?! WHAT THE HELL?!?!” Such good quality ! Keep going!

  7. Nice video! Playing fighting games is an amazing experience.

  8. “My first fighting game Tekken 2.”
    Me:*gasp* I feel like I found a brother in arms bc that was MY first fighting game too for my PS1. 🤩🤩🤩👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾

  9. I like the fact that you brought up having to unlock the roster in older fighting games. I've always felt like that's a feature that fighting game developers should bring back, even though I know they will never do that, since how could that ever get them more money? Looking at you netherrealm. Point is, making you unlock the roster like that gave you a reason to get better at the game. Since there was no online, you had to play these games locally, and you did not want to be the one who is being judged by your friends because you hadn't unlocked that cool character that everybody else is playing.

  10. There is no other genre of videogame but fighting.

    Everything else is boring cookie cutter trash

  11. Sorry I didn't watch this when it came out.
    Why you should play fighting games is a great genre of YouTube

  12. I think Tekken gets a bad wrap for 'lots of moves' and it puts people off.
    For Kazuya his first 5 moves are his jabs
    1
    (1)2
    (1)(2)2
    (1)1,2
    (1)(2)4,3
    It's like branching paths.
    I wouldn't say 1,2 and 1,2,4,3 are TOTALLY different moves
    The brackets are the repeated moves

  13. 8:30 thanks for that joke, I was gonna comment saying that the easy combo would be one button jump 1 button then super

  14. the problem with fighting games is they are probably the MOST unintuitive games to learn

  15. We're not good, but me and my friends are obsessed with dbfz. It's the main game we've been playing together for over a year.

  16. My issue with fighting games is that everyone else is so good I would have to make it a full time job to even be able to paly

  17. The fear of playing fighting games is similar to that of doing anything in life that would require huge investments like starting a family, starting a business, or learning a new skill. They are all experiences that often have a high failure rate at the beginning, but it all pays off later when the proper amount of investment are put in.

  18. Well man I mean it's not worth any more to play video games If you are in our early 20s tbh at least if you want to build your life they way you want I do like playing video games started when I was 4 years old but I don't play as much as I used to as I said I really want to achieve my goals when I will be 30

  19. Fighting games get boring real quick. The first months are addicting tho, all things said.

  20. I gave up on strive because after 20 hours I still have absolutely no idea what the hell is going on. Like, yeah, I just perfected someone two times in a row. And it feels even more slimy than getting perfected twice in a row, because I have no idea what I did and how to repeat it and I did not earned it no matter how you look at it.
    Like, yeah, it is fun, but it is "new kind of suffering" fund and it will take second career level of time investment to make it "fun" fun.

  21. I think i can speak on the behalf of the fighting game community when i say that we apricate what your trying to do. As fans of this genre of games, we of course want more people in the genre. I think that's why lobbies can be somewhat wholesome (at least in my experience). That being said, this will most likely fall on deaf ears, or ears of those who are already fans of the genre,. We currently live in a quick-dopamine-hit world, in order words, people don't want to learn, they just want enjoyment. They just want to feel good but not put in the effort to get there. As a ux designer, a key part of making people want to use my companies app more is to make the process as easy as possible. By making it easy, people can get their quick fix. How does this translate to fighting games? People just want to mash buttons to win. In street fighter, you will be lucky to win matches unless your going against another btn masher, while in tekken, its not as bad. There is even an easy command input mode to. Unless the barrier is reduced even more, fighting games are not going to become popular and will die out. What sucks even more is the time it takes to get good. You have to put in so much time, that it feels like a labour. I remember the amount of hours i put into Ryu in sf4, I spent so much of my free time, just learning combos in that horrible grid map, to only be okay. TO BE OKAY. For, me, I don't have that time anymore, kids are not going to get into it on the basis that they are going to get destroyed, so its not going to be fun. Not only that, but their friends are probably playing fortnite. Unless we want a brain dead game, the future of fighting games is not looking great. That being said, keep up the good work. You may get through to some folks.

    I also recommend trying to create a community. I don't have a voice but you do. A community on mentors and noobies, so that its not so bad. SO the noobies can learn and develop their skills in a fun way. I would like the fighting community to thrive. But we really need to work on it as a community. We might be able to develop a new love for the genre.

  22. I think i can speak on the behalf of the fighting game community when i say that we apricate what your trying to do. As fans of this genre of games, we of course want more people in the genre. I think that's why lobbies can be somewhat wholesome (at least in my experience). That being said, this will most likely fall on deaf ears, or ears of those who are already fans of the genre,. We currently live in a quick-dopamine-hit world, in order words, people don't want to learn, they just want enjoyment. They just want to feel good but not put in the effort to get there. As a ux designer, a key part of making people want to use my companies app more is to make the process as easy as possible. By making it easy, people can get their quick fix. How does this translate to fighting games? People just want to mash buttons to win. In street fighter, you will be lucky to win matches unless your going against another btn masher, while in tekken, its not as bad. There is even an easy command input mode to. Unless the barrier is reduced even more, fighting games are not going to become popular and will die out. What sucks even more is the time it takes to get good. You have to put in so much time, that it feels like a labour. I remember the amount of hours i put into Ryu in sf4, I spent so much of my free time, just learning combos in that horrible grid map, to only be okay. TO BE OKAY. For, me, I don't have that time anymore, kids are not going to get into it on the basis that they are going to get destroyed, so its not going to be fun. Not only that, but their friends are probably playing fortnite. Unless we want a brain dead game, the future of fighting games is not looking great. That being said, keep up the good work. You may get through to some folks.

    I also recommend trying to create a community. I don't have a voice but you do. A community on mentors and noobies, so that its not so bad. SO the noobies can learn and develop their skills in a fun way. I would like the fighting community to thrive. But we really need to work on it as a community. We might be able to develop a new love for the genre.

  23. YOOOOOOO this is so underrated!!!!!!! Subs for days!!! when's the next vid dropping??!

  24. YOOOOOOO this is so underrated!!!!!!! Subs for days!!! when's the next vid dropping??!

  25. I'm surprised you only have this little subs, the quality is great for a small YouTuber

  26. I'm surprised you only have this little subs, the quality is great for a small YouTuber

  27. Getting good feels good, often better than just winning because you got good luck in card games or your team carried you in a MOBA or shooter.
    Iterative improvement is not for everyone, but for the people who get it, it's the best feeling you can get from any hobby.

  28. Getting good feels good, often better than just winning because you got good luck in card games or your team carried you in a MOBA or shooter.
    Iterative improvement is not for everyone, but for the people who get it, it's the best feeling you can get from any hobby.

  29. 7:15 I think this is 1. Wrong, and more importantly 2. The main thing keeping people from getting into it. You’re street fighter example falls flat on its face when in 3rd strike Chun li does in fact spam normals. She doesn’t do hyper complicated combos like 3rd and 2nd best characters Ken and yun. She throws out heavies trying to keep you away and build meter, or is doing the easiest hit confirm combo of c.mk to super. And she’s the best character in the game despite lacking these supposedly “important combos” and barely has combos outside of a couple of instances.

    In plenty of fighting games and plenty of characters do get by by just using good normals and poking you. It hurts entree level interest a lot of you look at a game like kof 98 and show people orochi Chris, Heavy D!, and Geese and say “this is how you play fighting games” because they see this hyper dexterous bs and go “yeah that’s not for me” even though you’ve got Ralf Clark and Heidern who’re not only characters that you don’t even really need to learn a combo bigger than close heavy into grab, they were specifically made as a team in the first 2 games as beginner level characters who’re not only good despite this, they didn’t require anything more than you to be smart about how you used your buttons. Ralf more so than any character typically had bad specials overall save his command grab and dive kick to encourage the idea that you can just pot shot guys and if that’s what your guys good at that’s great for you.

    If you just told people to pick him because he doesn’t need to know combos to be effective they’ll get more interested because they’ll build fundamentals and feel like they’re actually doing something and feel like they’re making deliberate decisions, then will try to learn more nuanced stuff off of that interest.

  30. 7:15 I think this is 1. Wrong, and more importantly 2. The main thing keeping people from getting into it. You’re street fighter example falls flat on its face when in 3rd strike Chun li does in fact spam normals. She doesn’t do hyper complicated combos like 3rd and 2nd best characters Ken and yun. She throws out heavies trying to keep you away and build meter, or is doing the easiest hit confirm combo of c.mk to super. And she’s the best character in the game despite lacking these supposedly “important combos” and barely has combos outside of a couple of instances.

    In plenty of fighting games and plenty of characters do get by by just using good normals and poking you. It hurts entree level interest a lot of you look at a game like kof 98 and show people orochi Chris, Heavy D!, and Geese and say “this is how you play fighting games” because they see this hyper dexterous bs and go “yeah that’s not for me” even though you’ve got Ralf Clark and Heidern who’re not only characters that you don’t even really need to learn a combo bigger than close heavy into grab, they were specifically made as a team in the first 2 games as beginner level characters who’re not only good despite this, they didn’t require anything more than you to be smart about how you used your buttons. Ralf more so than any character typically had bad specials overall save his command grab and dive kick to encourage the idea that you can just pot shot guys and if that’s what your guys good at that’s great for you.

    If you just told people to pick him because he doesn’t need to know combos to be effective they’ll get more interested because they’ll build fundamentals and feel like they’re actually doing something and feel like they’re making deliberate decisions, then will try to learn more nuanced stuff off of that interest.

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